Week in Review


Obamacare

Hindsight is said to be 20/20, but you and I didn’t need to see the implementation of Obamacare to know it would have a disastrous impact on American families and come between many individuals and their doctors. 

 

Spotlight

This week, NPRI continued its commitment to keep government accountable and transparent by updating TransparentNevada.com with over 128,000 public-employee salary records. 

 

Voting to extend unemployment

This week, the Senate voted to extend long-term unemployment benefits, disregarding the fact that extending such benefits has been shown to increase the length of time people remain unemployed.

 

Truth about the Texas margin tax

Texas has already shown Nevada a margin tax is a bad bet. Join us in May to learn more about the Texas margin tax mistake.

 

The Silver State’s golden compensation packages

Whether you’re a current government employee or a retired one, Nevada is the place to be. That’s because Nevada public employees take a lot from taxpayers — both when they’re working and after they retire. 

 

Sour Sixteen

The White House tried to use the NCAA tournament to garner more support for its failing legislation by encouraging people to make their own March Madness picks. But, instead of choosing winning college basketball teams, the White House wants you to choose the “16 sweetest reasons to get covered.”

 

Just passing through the Catalyst Fund

NPRI President Andy Matthews explains more details of NPRI’s case against the state and its unconstitutional subsidies to private companies.

 

Bring out your stories

The teachers union is seeking to reduce economic growth at one of the worst possible times — when tens of thousands of Nevadans are underemployed or unemployed and struggling to support their families. While the numbers of projected job and business loss speak for themselves, the personal stories of those who will be impacted by the margin tax are also important to tell.

 

Scholarship

When you work in the think-tank world, where days are consumed with analyzing policy, keeping tabs on the government and promoting transparency, encounters with 16, 17 and 18 year olds can be rare.

It’s not that we don’t want teens to spend their Friday and Saturday nights reading about outrageous and out-of-control government spending in our Piglet Book, or about our efforts to combat the state’s disregard for its own constitution, or our solutions to Nevada’s economic and educational challenges. We know those things are of value to everyone, whether they be 18 or 80.

But the reality is that high school seniors, particularly this time of year, have a lot of other things to worry about — like getting into college and finding a way to pay for it. For the past three years, we’ve been fortunate enough to help make the latter task a little easier for students in Clark County by offering The Professor R.S. Nigam & NPRI Freedom Scholarship.

 

Suing GOED

This was a big week for NPRI.

On Wednesday, our Center for Justice and Constitutional Litigation challenged the constitutionality of the state government’s efforts to pick winners and losers in the economy through the Catalyst Fund.

Most of the media coverage since we filed the case — and there’s been plenty of it over the past two days — has rightly focused on the relevant legal issue: The Nevada Constitution expressly prohibits the state from giving money to private companies, and that is what the Governor’s Office of Economic Development is doing through the Catalyst Fund.

That constitutional issue is at the heart of this lawsuit, along with the basic unjustness of making a business subsidize its competition, and I urge you to read Joseph Becker’s detailed explanation of those issues here.

But today, I’d like to discuss another angle to this story, and to dive into the economic problems inherent to the Catalyst Fund’s existence.

Total Records: 70

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