Ticket

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


Ticket

One of the tenets of conservatism is the belief that individuals and families make better choices for themselves than government bureaucrats.

One of the places we see this most clearly demonstrated is in education. For the last century, government has run the vast majority of our nation’s schools with predictable results. As graduation rates and educational performance decreased, bureaucrats demanded more control and more money to address the problems they created. And despite spending more and centralizing control more and more, results continued to decline.

All the way back in the 1950s, the great economist Milton Friedman introduced the solution — school choice. Let parents control a portion of the money the government already spends to choose the school that’s best for their child.

In the last few decades, this idea has spread across the nation, and now 21 states and Washington, D.C., have some form of school choice. These programs have produced academic gains in student achievement for those participating in them, and also for those students who remained in traditional public schools. And since these programs can save the government money, it’s a true win-win-win.

While Nevada does offer some options to parents — like charter schools, magnet schools, online learning and the freedom to home school — it lags behind other states with school-choice programs.

What’s easy for me to lose sight of in the discussion of school-choice programs or test-score improvements are the stories of the children and families who have benefitted from school choice.

And that’s why I’m so excited to let you know about a free screening of the movie “The Ticket” that we’re hosting on Jan. 28 in both Reno and Las Vegas. “The Ticket” is a 38-minute documentary on the power of school choice — focusing on the stories behind the stats. This trailer does a great job sharing some of the stories you’ll see in the movie.

Our Reno event will run from 10 to 11:30 a.m. and will feature both the movie and a panel discussion hosted by KKOH’s Dan Mason and featuring “The Ticket” filmmaker Bob Bowdon and school-choice experts from the Reno area.

Our Las Vegas event will run from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and will include the movie and a panel discussion hosted by KXNT’s Kevin Wall and featuring Bowdon and Vegas-area school-choice experts.

This is a free event for the whole family, so please bring your kids and invite your neighbors to see the movie.

We will be sending out locations to you early next week, but I hope you will save the date now.

We’re also pleased to be co-hosting these events with The LIBRE Initiative and the RISE Education Resource Center as part of National School Choice Week.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Until next time,

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you next time.

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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Resolved

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


Resolved

Have you ever made a New Year’s resolution?

I’ve known people who’ve vowed to exercise more, spend quality with their family, eat healthy, read more or even to follow that dream they’ve always had.

I’ve even made some resolutions myself, with varying degrees of success.

A New Year’s resolution is a conscious acknowledgment of personal responsibility — that you have the power to change your job, your body, your circumstances and your life. And you do have that power. Where I’ve succeeded or failed in keeping resolutions, the credit or blame has been my own. I’m guessing your experience has been similar.

When I step back and think about it, New Year’s resolutions reveal one reason why I’m a free-market conservative. I believe in personal responsibility.

If someone makes a wise decision, works hard and follows through, he or she has the right to reap the rewards that come from that decision.

If someone gets up at 5:30 each morning and exercises for an hour, we celebrate that person’s improved fitness.

So why is it that when someone gets up at 5:30 each morning to build a business and improve the lives of others by offering their customers a desirable product at a competitive price, some people want to attack that person’s financial success, or claim, “You didn’t build that”?

Government’s job is to protect our God-given freedoms that allow us to make and then act on our resolutions, not punish those who succeed in keeping theirs.

I hope you had a Happy New Year, and I wish you the best of success in keeping your resolutions.

We’ve slowed our publishing down a bit for the holidays and for some planning time, but we’ll be back up to full speed on Monday. I want you to be the first to know that we’re planning a National School Choice Week event that we’re really excited about.

We’ll send out more details early next week, but mark your calendar for Jan. 28.

Until next time,

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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Happy holidays from NPRI

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


Happy holidays from NPRI

When I look back at the past year, I’m really amazed by how much has happened here at NPRI. From helping hundreds of teachers leave their union, to our litigation victories to uphold the rule of law, to our policy work advancing free-market solutions, 2013 was the most exciting and productive year we’ve ever had here at the Institute.

It is NPRI’s members, of course, who make it all possible, and it was wonderful to see so many of our friends last night at our open house/holiday party at our Las Vegas office. In lieu of a typical Week in Review column today, I wanted to invite you to go to our Facebook page and view pictures from yesterday and our Reno open house in November. I hope you enjoy them.

Click here to see more photos on Facebook, and if you’re one of the few who haven’t done so already, like our page while you’re there.

And of course, I want to thank you for all of your support over the past year. I know our staff is looking forward to an even more successful 2014, and I’m grateful to know that you’ll be fighting alongside us every step of the way.

I’ll be out of town next week, spending Christmas with my family back in Massachusetts, so this will be the last Week in Review of 2013.

From all of us at NPRI, happy holidays to you and yours, and we’ll see you next year!

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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My best idea ever

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


My best idea ever

Here at NPRI, we’re all about solutions, and boy, have I got one for you today.

I think we should increase the minimum wage to $1,500 an hour.

I thought of this after reading about President Obama’s push to increase the minimum wage to more than $10 an hour, and then seeing a study touted by liberal groups here in Nevada calling for Silver State policymakers to go even further and set the minimum hourly wage at $15.

The way liberals explain it, hiking the minimum wage would increase workers’ take-home pay, which would give them more money to spend in the economy, which would create more jobs, and so on.

So I figure, why think so small? If a minimum wage of $10 or $15 an hour would produce such wonderful benefits, then just think about how much economic prosperity we could generate by jacking the rate all the way up to $1,500. Or how about $15 trillion?

If that sounds absurd, it’s because, obviously, it is. But it’s also a logical extension of the argument liberals make when they call for minimum-wage increases. The truth is the opposite. A $1,500-an-hour minimum wage would be more destructive than $10 or $15 an hour, but even those smaller amounts would have a destructive impact.

Minimum-wage laws kill jobs. And increasing the minimum wage would kill even more of them. This is true for a very simple reason: If you increase the cost of something to an employer, he will be able to afford less of it. This means that entry-level jobs will disappear or, as we’re seeing already, human workers will be replaced by machines. In other words, minimum-wage laws hurt the very people they’re intended to help by pricing those people out of the labor market.

What advocates of minimum-wage increases overlook is that jobs at that level serve as entry-level jobs that let young or inexperienced workers gain skills and then move up. They’re not supposed to support a 35-year-old head of household. But that’s exactly what these advocates claim, which is why they’ve adopted the term “living wage” to describe what they seek to implement.

But a “living wage” would turn into “no wages” for many workers, because higher minimum wages increase unemployment. For instance, the teen unemployment rate in Nevada was over 25 percent in 2012, and for young adults it was over 15 percent. These are the individuals who are hurt the most by minimum-wage laws, and they’re the ones who will suffer even further if liberals succeed in pushing the rate even higher.

You don’t create jobs by making it more difficult for employers to hire anybody. To believe otherwise requires one to ignore not only the most basic laws of economics, but also the kind of common-sense thinking we all practice in our day-to-day lives.

But here’s an idea for those who disagree: If you don’t think current businesses are paying people what they’re worth, then go open your own business and pay people whatever you want. In a market economy, anyone can be an entrepreneur. If others are exploiting workers, then you have a great opportunity to steal surplus value by hiring them away with higher wages and putting the incumbent firms out of business, stealing their market share. You just have to hope your customers will be willing to pay your prices, but I’m sure you’ve thought that all through.

I’ll be curious to see how it goes.

Thanks for reading, and have a great weekend.

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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The failure of a philosophy

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


The failure of a philosophy

You know things aren’t going well for you as a president when the debate between your supporters and detractors isn’t over whether you’re a success or a failure, but over the reasons why you’ve failed.

Many of President Obama’s staunchest defenders have been shell-shocked by the still-unfolding disaster that is the (un)Affordable Care Act, and the honesty some of them have shown in acknowledging that disaster is commendable. But what’s striking is how many of them have insisted on chalking it up to either a botched rollout owing to a few technological glitches, or even a mere failure of public relations. A Nov. 3 column by the Washington Post’s E.J. Dionne captured both sentiments. After imploring the law’s defenders to focus their attention on “simplifying and fixing the Web site,” Dionne then lamented that the administration “has never adequately defended the law.” Yes, because what Obamacare really needed was one more speech from the president.

A favorite argument among conservatives, on the other hand, has been that the problem is much deeper than the merely cosmetic, and that the fiasco is at least partially attributable to the president’s inexperience and general incompetence. For example, a couple weeks ago Dr. Charles Krauthammer said on FOX News that “this is really incompetence of a level that is indescribable. And it stands to reason. We've got a president who never ran anything.”

Krauthammer is right. (Isn’t he always?) But even his explanation gets at only part of the most important lesson here. Even under more capable management, Obamacare would still be a mess. After all, those who successfully navigate the website find plans with higher premiums and deductibles, but fewer covered doctors.

What we’re witnessing here is not just the failure of a president, an administration or even a particular program, but the next phase of the ongoing failure of liberals’ governmental philosophy.

That philosophy holds that the way to create prosperity and otherwise improve society is to empower the state with ever more control over — well, just about everything. Personal decisions — say, what type of health insurance (if any) to buy — should be made not by an individual but by government busybodies. And economic decisions — which products are worthy of investment, how much a business owner should pay for labor, etc. — are better left to the bureaucrats as well.

As much as any president in American history, Barack Obama embodies this philosophy. And more than any other, he has been able to put it into action. The result has been one failure after another.

One of the most amazing things about the Obamacare story is that the law has been such a spectacular failure for this president, that it can almost make you forget about all of his others.

Such as the stimulus. Remember that? The federal government spent $787 billion to rejuvenate the economy, and nearly five years later we’re still dealing with chronically high unemployment. A big chunk of the stimulus spending was on so-called “investments” in clean-energy companies. Such as Solyndra, which got $535 million in federal loans — right before going belly-up.

And let’s not forget Cash for Clunkers, a program billed as a way to create jobs while also helping the environment by getting energy-inefficient vehicles off the road. Did it work? A study from the Brookings Institution found that the program cost $1.4 million for every job created and did almost nothing to reduce carbon emissions.

The common thread running through all of these failures is not faulty technology, inadequate PR, or even lax oversight or managerial incompetence. It’s that they were all rooted in the philosophy I described above. Each of these programs substitutes the judgment of government bureaucrats for that of producers and consumers acting in a free market, and for that reason, they were all destined to fail from the word “go.”

Take America’s most talented CEO, pair him up with a superior media firm and give him access to all the wiz kids at Amazon or Apple or wherever, and even he won’t be able to out-perform the cooperation, community and organization produced by hundreds of millions of individuals acting in their own self-interest.

The problems with Obamacare are exacerbated by its embarrassing website, but the underlying problem is that neither President Obama nor anyone else can run our nation’s health-care system better than the free market can.

Until next time,

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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Thanksgiving: The true story

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


Thanksgiving: The true story

Last year at Thanksgiving, I shared a great piece I’d read about the true story behind that special holiday. I received an enormous amount of positive feedback on it, and so I thought that this year, I’d simply publish last year’s column once again. Enjoy…  

I’ve always thought of Thanksgiving as the quintessentially American holiday, bringing together so many of the things — faith, food, football, family and friends — that make living in this country so wonderful, and so worthy of deep appreciation.

But one of my very favorite things to do at this time of year is to revisit the story of the very first Thanksgiving.

We all know the story of how the Thanksgiving tradition began — or at least, we know the version of the story that has been approved for official telling in the American classroom. And, having grown up only 30 miles or so from Plymouth, Mass., I got to hear the story not just from my teachers, but directly from the “Pilgrims” themselves on many a class field trip. In other words, it’s a tale with which I became quite familiar.

It wasn’t until many years later, however, that I finally learned the real story of Thanksgiving. That is to say, I discovered the reason why Thanksgiving represents not simply a timeless tradition, but also the triumph of what would become America’s most fundamental values. In short, it’s a story of capitalism prevailing over collectivism.

Many writers and commentators have offered their own takes on this story, but one that I especially enjoyed reading was a piece written by Julie Borowski and published one year ago. I urge you to read the whole thing, but I wanted to share the most relevant part here:

Centuries before the Communist Manifesto was even published, the Pilgrims set up an economic system that looked similar to the “utopia” advocated by Karl Marx. In the early years of the Plymouth Plantation, there was no such thing as private property. All property was held in common and it was forbidden for anyone to produce their own food. It was up to the plantation officials to distribute food and supplies to the Pilgrims based on equality and need. 

The Plantation leaders showed their immense lack of knowledge regarding basic economic principles. Plymouth County Governor William Bradford wrote that, “the taking away of property, and bringing in community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing.” That clearly was not the case since the Pilgrims experienced great despair and massive food shortages for several years.

The Plymouth Plantation lacked the appropriate incentive structure. As economics Professor Benjamin Powell writes, “bad weather or lack of farming knowledge did not cause the pilgrims’ shortages. Bad economic incentives did.” Many Pilgrims faked illness or stole instead of working in the fields to produce food. William Bradford later wrote that the colony was filled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” He stated that the crops were so small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

William Bradford finally decided to change course by implementing a new economic system in 1623. He assigned “every family a parcel of land” to do with it as they saw fit and the results were nothing short of miraculous. For the first time in the New World, families could enjoy the fruits of their labor. While it was not a complete private property system, the move away from collectivism saved the Pilgrims. As Governor William Bradford wrote that year, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty.”

I have much to be thankful for this year, but one thing for which we should all give thanks is that William Bradford was able to learn from his initial mistake.

And let’s all be hopeful, too, that those who lead our nation today have the same capacity.

On behalf of all of us at the Nevada Policy Research Institute, I’d like to wish you and yours a happy and healthy Thanksgiving.

Warmest regards,

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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The new Nevada Journal

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


The new Nevada Journal

Long-time followers of NPRI will be familiar with the evolution of Nevada Journal, the Institute’s news-reporting operation. Launched as a hard-copy magazine in 1996, Nevada Journal went dormant in 2001 before we finally resuscitated it as an online publication in 2009.

While its format has changed, Nevada Journal’s purpose has not. It exists to provide high-quality reporting on issues that often get overlooked by the traditional media. In recent years, we’ve brought many such stories to light, including the dubious financial practices of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, statewide problems with property-tax assessment practices, and the “double dipping” by former Assembly speaker John Oceguera as both a legislator and a North Las Vegas firefighter.

And now, I’d like to share with you another new development with Nevada Journal that will make us even more effective at fulfilling its mission.

I’m happy to announce that we’ve recently begun to incorporate content from the Associated Press at nevadajournal.com. What that means is that in addition to the solid original reporting that our own staff produces, we’ll also feature AP stories that will be of great interest to our readers.

The changing newsroom dynamics in recent years have meant that a lot of the AP’s best work — including some of its superior in-depth reporting — doesn’t make it into the mainstream press. But now, we’re making many of those stories available for public consumption.

I urge you to check out the new nevadajournal.com — recently redesigned to feature the AP content prominently — and I also hope you’ll revisit frequently to get the latest news and developments.

And of course, as I said already, we’ll continue to generate our own quality news stories on issues that impact the lives of Nevadans. (If you haven’t seen Steve Miller’s latest piece on the security risks brought on by the Obamacare fiasco, go read it now. Believe me: You don’t want to miss it.)

I’m extremely proud of the tremendous job that Steve and his team have done in making Nevada Journal the outstanding news resource it is. But I know he shares my commitment to looking constantly for new ways to better serve our readers. So please, visit nevadajournal.com and check out its new look — and send me any feedback or suggestions you may have for how we can make it even better. As always, you can reach me at am@npri.org.

Take care, and have a great weekend.

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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What I saw in Reno

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


What I saw in Reno

I’ll be boarding a plane to return to Las Vegas in just a few hours, after wrapping up a week-long trip to Reno — and boy, what a week it’s been.

My schedule has been filled just about every hour this week, with meetings, phone calls, some work on a few exciting projects we’ve got cooking, a couple of speeches — and, of course, the “Thanksgiving Thank You” event we held at NPRI’s Reno office on Tuesday.

A couple takeaways from that open house: First, it was really touching to see how many of our supporters were willing to take some time out of their busy schedules to come by and see us. By my rough count, we had about 100 people show up over the course of the four-hour event, and I want to extend my sincerest thanks to each and every one of you who did so. And a special thank you is owed to Dan Mason and his team at KKOH, for joining us for a live broadcast from 3 to 5 p.m. and injecting some additional energy and fun into the festivities.

Second, it was truly inspiring to be able to talk to those who attended, and to learn about what they’re all doing to provide hope and opportunity for Nevadans. And I don’t just mean their support for NPRI — although that is certainly most appreciated. What I mean is the various activities and organizations they’re involved in as part of their efforts to make Nevada stronger, freer and more prosperous.

I had a chance to talk with dozens of freedom-loving Nevadans who have dedicated themselves to that cause on one front or another. I talked with current lawmakers, candidates, political operatives, bloggers, citizen-activists, policy researchers, and on and on. I chatted with senior citizens who had been fighting in the political arena for 40 years, and young up-and-comers who were just starting to break into the policy world.

What was really impressive about so many of these folks was that in many cases, their political activities are something they’ve taken on in addition to their day jobs. Obviously, I spend a lot of time and effort working to advance NPRI’s ideals of free enterprise and individual liberty. But this is my full-time job. I am amazed at the number of people I spoke to who were putting in 40 hours (or more) a week at their day job and were then taking on their political causes in their spare time.

A typical response, when I’d ask someone what he or she did, would be: “Well, I work Monday through Friday during business hours as a paralegal, but then I’m also involved in an effort to help inform voters about some of the problems with Common Core.”

Or: “I just started a new business, but on weekends I’ve been helping a couple of Assembly candidates get their campaigns off the ground.”

The reason I’m sharing all this with you is that I see it as another reason for optimism, along with the object lesson provided by Obamacare's spectacular failure, and the decision by the Washoe County Commission not to raise sales and property taxes through the constitutionally dubious AB 46 scheme. There are a lot of good, smart, dedicated individuals here in our state who want to help turn things around, and they’re willing to sacrifice much of what could be their leisure time in order to help advance freedom for us all.

Like I said, very inspiring.

So I know the next time I’m thinking about the many problems Nevada is facing, or overwhelmed by the number of obstacles to making the changes we really need, I’ll remember those conversations I had this week and know that our cause is in good hands. There’s a long way to go, but together, we're advancing and defending liberty.

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you next time.

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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179 percent

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


179 percent

I’ve written quite a bit lately about the many problems plaguing the Obamacare rollout, and I’ve focused for the most part on the national picture — the disastrous launch of Healthcare.gov, the millions of individual-market insurance plans being canceled, the woefully unsound economic theory upon which the law rests, etc.   

So I thought this week I’d take a look at how the situation is playing out right here in Nevada.

I wish I hadn’t.

As NPRI’s own Steve Miller reported earlier this week at our news website NevadaJournal.com, the ill effects of the health-care law are actually more pronounced here in Nevada than anywhere else in the country.

That’s right. Reporting on an analysis by the Manhattan Institute, Steve writes:

While the average state will face a premium increase of 41 percent, the average increase facing Nevadans is over four times that, at 179 percent — the most in the nation, according to the new report.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen misguided national policy take its worst toll in Nevada. Remember the calamity caused by the feds’ meddling in the housing market? Guess which state ended up with the most severe home-foreclosure crisis as a result. Yep. Ours.

Even more grating than the news about Nevada’s skyrocketing health-insurance premiums is the reason behind it. Steve asked one of the study’s authors why the problem has been so extreme here in the Silver State, and reports that:

One factor, he said, is that in Nevada, as in many states in the South and the Southwest, the insurance marketplace has been relatively unregulated, compared to much of the country.

In other words, it is precisely because Nevada had a comparatively sound approach to health-care policy — by limiting regulation of the insurance market — that we’ve had the screws put to us so badly. And that underscores a deeper problem: The bigger and further-reaching our federal government becomes, the harder it’s going to be for states, no matter how well governed, to avoid the effects of bad national policy.

It’s just too bad there isn’t a prominent Nevadan in a position of power in Washington, D.C., who could look out for his home state and make sure these kinds of things didn’t happen. But I guess those are the breaks.

By the way, I want to thank those of you who wrote to me in response to my Red Sox column last week. I received far too many emails for me to possibly respond to them all, but please know that I appreciate you taking the time to write.

Oh, and I wanted to give you a quick update on our “Thanksgiving Thank You” event scheduled for this coming Tuesday at our Reno office. We’ve just confirmed that radio host Dan Mason of KKOH is going to broadcast his show live from our party, so you won’t want to miss it. We’re located at 1225 Westfield Ave., No. 7, and I hope you’ll come by (and bring a friend or two!) anytime between 3 and 7 p.m.

As always, thanks for reading, and I hope you have a wonderful weekend.

Regards,

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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Champs

Every week, NPRI President Andy Matthews writes a column for NPRI's week-in-review email. If you are not getting our emails, which contain our latest commentaries and news stories, you can sign up here to receive them.


Champs

I get ribbed a lot for being from Massachusetts, what with the state’s famed affinity for big government, high taxes and liberal politicians.

But I’ve always been quick to defend my home turf, and to point out that what the Bay State has to offer isn’t all bad. There’s the rich history, the amazing seafood, the breathtaking foliage in the fall.

And, of course, the Boston Red Sox.

In case you missed it, the Sox were crowned World Series champions on Wednesday night, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 to take the Fall Classic in six games. It was Boston’s third World Series title in the past decade and, remarkably, came just one season after the team posted its worst record in 47 years to finish dead last in the American League East division. All championships are sweet, but that incredible turnaround made this year’s all the more satisfying.

Baseball has always been in my blood — I started playing Tee ball at the age of four or five, and I’m told my first word was actually “ball” — but growing up a Red Sox fan was an utterly miserable experience. Just about any sports fan will be quite familiar with the team’s legendary championship drought, which lasted 86 years before the Sox finally won it all in 2004. To put that in perspective, my grandfather was born April 4, 1920 and died just three days shy of his 84th birthday, and the Red Sox didn’t win a single World Series in his lifetime.

Not that they didn’t come close. Four times during that span they came within one game of winning the prize, only to fall short. I wasn’t born until 1978, so I was spared having to witness much of that heartache first-hand. But believe me — New Englanders made sure to raise their children to be well-versed in the agonizing story of the Olde Towne Team.

These days, however, that team has a whole new identity. No longer the hapless losers of yesteryear, the Red Sox have become baseball’s most dominant club of the new century, and Boston fans are showing off a whole lot of swagger of late, enjoying that clam chowdah with a side of braggadocio. I’ve been known to slip back into my once-prominent Boston accent on occasion — usually after a couple pints of Sam Adams — and you can be sure I’ll be letting it fly a bit more loosely than usual in the coming weeks.

And, if you live in the Reno area, you will have an opportunity to hear that accent for yourself. On Nov. 12, I’ll be at NPRI’s Northern Nevada office for a special “Thanksgiving Thank You” event open to all Institute supporters and anyone else who’d like to drop by. (Come on, you had to know I’d work in an NPRI angle at some point.) My attempts to recast the event as a Red Sox victory celebration were nixed by the staff (so much for being president!) but it’s going to be a fun time either way. We’ll have plenty of finger food and beverages, and you’ll have a chance to mingle with some of our staff and Board members and get an update on our work.

So I have three requests of you. One, come join us on Nov. 12, anytime between 3 and 7 p.m. (We’re at 1225 Westfield Ave., No. 7, right across the street from Reno High School.) Two, forward this email to anyone else you think would be interested in stopping by.

And three: If you know any people from Massachusetts, be sure to take a moment over the next few days to congratulate them on an outstanding baseball season.

Now if we could just do something about their politics…

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you next time.

Andy Matthews
NPRI President


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Total Records: 1791

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