Steven Miller

Vice President, Policy

Steven Miller is vice president for policy at NPRI and has been full-time with the Institute since 1997. Steven oversees public policy research, including the Institute's studies, conferences, commentaries and in-depth research projects.


Recent Work

Incentives, community and the future of Lake Tahoe

July 29, 2014

To preserve gems like Lake Tahoe, many came to believe, individual rights must be overridden and local governments stripped of powers. And so the bi-state Tahoe Compact and TRPA came to be. But, this is far from the only option; numerous, viable alternatives exist.

Nevada teacher union eyes new priority for ‘organizing’

Approach downplays services for members, aims for advocacy, ultimate militancy

July 23, 2014

The Nevada State Education Association is shifting it from a service model to one of militant-style advocacy. 

Why Big New Taxes Won't Fix Nevada Public Schools

As teacher-union leader Al Shanker explained, the core problem isn't money

May 27, 2014

Money isn’t the real problem with K-12 public education. Albert Shanker, the longtime president of the national American Federation of Teachers, frequently — despite his union job — felt compelled to tell the truth.  For the first time, NPRI put its message in a wholly cartoon format, publishing a slideshow explaining Shanker’s important comments.

NLRB finds Culinary Union threatens, attempts to intimidate non-union workers

Judge orders Culinary Union to publicly pledge it will not “threaten” workers

May 13, 2014

LAS VEGAS — For the second time in a year, a Las Vegas resort-industry union — this time the powerful Culinary Union Local 226 — has been found guilty of violating federal labor law with threats and attempts to intimidate non-union workers on the Strip.

Al Shanker identifies why margin tax wouldn’t improve Nevada education

Former union president’s honest assessment of US education hinges on lack of accountability

April 14, 2014

Albert Shanker, the late president of the American Federation of Teachers union, explained the fundamental problem with public schools: Without competition, there’s no incentive for schools to improve.