Victor Joecks

Executive Vice President

vj@npri.org

Victor Joecks is executive vice president at the Nevada Policy Research Institute and oversees the execution of NPRI's strategic plan and policy initiatives. He joined the Institute in 2009 and previously served as its communication director. Under his leadership, NPRI obtained record amounts of state and national media coverage.


Recent Work

NPRI: Gov. Sandoval’s proposed business license tax is complex, destructive, unnecessary

January 29, 2015

CARSON CITY – Responding to Gov. Brian Sandoval’s release of details of his new business-license tax proposal, NPRI executive vice president Victor Joecks issued the following comments:

As part of his push for the largest tax increase in Nevada history, Gov. Sandoval is unfortunately trying to subject all Nevada businesses to a destructive new gross receipts tax. His proposal is a modified version of the margin tax that voters rejected last fall by a massive 4-to-1 margin

PERS response to NPRI pension study confirms accuracy of NPRI’s study

PERS response to NPRI pension study confirms accuracy of NPRI’s study

January 28, 2015

Last week, my colleague Robert Fellner and I released a study that compared the pensions of recent full-career government employee retirees with their final year of base pay.

PERS response to NPRI pension study confirms accuracy of NPRI’s study

January 28, 2015

Last week, my colleague Robert Fellner and I released a study that compared the pensions of recent full-career government employee retirees with their final year of base pay.

Retiring in the lap of luxury

Nevada government pensions are often better than paychecks

January 22, 2015

This analysis examines 10 of Nevada’s largest government agencies and compares the full-year equivalent 2013 retirement payouts of 2011-2013 retirees who had 30 years of service or more with their final-year base pay.

Nevada will collect more in taxes next biennium without sunsets than it did in this biennium with sunsets

January 20, 2015

In FY 2014-15, Nevada will collect $6.27 billion in taxes for its general fund, which includes around $600 million in sunset taxes.  For FY 2016-17, Nevada will collect $6.33 billion in taxes without the sunset taxes.