Victor Joecks

Executive Vice President

vj@npri.org

Victor Joecks is executive vice president at the Nevada Policy Research Institute and oversees the execution of NPRI's strategic plan and policy initiatives. He joined the Institute in 2009 and previously served as its communication director. Under his leadership, NPRI obtained record amounts of state and national media coverage.


Recent Work

Testimony on AB182: Collective bargaining reforms will create a better balance of power

March 25, 2015

We strongly support AB182. This an excellent bill full of common-sense reforms that will create a better balance of power between taxpayers and elected officials and unionized local government employees.

NPRI releases alternative budget proposal

"Need" for tax increases eliminated

March 23, 2015

CARSON CITY – Today, the Nevada Policy Research Institute released an alternative line-by-line budget for Nevada, entitled the Freedom Budget 2016-2017.

NPRI comments on Sandoval’s job-killing gross receipts BLT

March 18, 2015

CARSON CITY – In response to today’s hearing by the Senate and Assembly Taxation Committees on Gov. Brian Sandoval’s Gross Receipt Business License Tax, NPRI Executive Vice President Victor Joecks released the following comments:

Gov. Brian Sandoval can put on a political circus, but his dog-and-pony show can’t mask the problems with SB252, his Gross Receipt Business License Tax. In November, voters rejected a similar proposal by a 4-to-1 ratio, because they understood that raising taxes on businesses that are losing money will kill jobs and force struggling businesses to close their doors. 

SB252: Sandoval’s job-killing tax

March 18, 2015

At 1 p.m. on Wednesday, March 18, Gov. Brian Sandoval is going to make a presentation before the Senate Taxation Committee on SB252. That’s his bill to implement a Gross-Receipts Business License Tax, which is a modified version of the margin tax. 

Sandoval to voters in 2014: Help me ‘keep taxes low’

Roberson also touted fighting ‘for tax cuts’ in 2014 election

March 16, 2015

In campaign materials sent during the 2014 election, Gov. Brian Sandoval told voters that he wanted to “keep taxes low.” After getting elected, he's pushing for the largest tax hike in state history.